Uncle Roger's Notebooks of Daily Life

Introduction

My life is, to me, ripe with frequent challenges, occasional successes, spontaneous laughter, adequate tears, and enough *life* to last me a lifetime. To you, however, it surely seems most pedestrian. And therefore, I recycle the name I used previously and call this my Notebooks of Daily Life. Daily, because it's everyday in nature, ordinary. These conglomeration of events that are my life are of interest to me because I live it, perhaps mildly so to those who are touched by it, and could only be of perverse, morbid curiosity to anyone else. Yet, I offer them here nonetheless. Make of them what you will, and perhaps you can learn from my mistakes.


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Saturday, September 08, 2007

Colonel Klink for President

When I was younger, I used to watch Hogan's Heroes. One of the unimportant details I remembered most from the show was the Geneva Convention. I didn't know who was at the convention, but I figured it must have been some pretty powerful people since whenever Colonel Klink tried to do something mean, Colonel Hogan just had to say "Geneva Convention" and Colonel Klink would straighten up and fly right.

That seemed to me to be pretty impressive -- and pretty important. The Geneva Convention was something special if it could make even the callous Nazis do the right thing. I was very impressed.

Of course, the Geneva Conventions are a set of four treaties that deal primarily with the treatment of non-combatants and prisoners of war. What is sad is that these treaties which, at least in Hollywood, could temper the Nazis, seem to have no effect on our own leaders. Our president, sad as it is, has decided that we, for some unknown reason, don't have to follow those treaties, the earliest of which dates back to 1864 and which we signed in 1882.

It seems to me that we, given our great wealth and power, ought to be setting an example, especially if we want to run around forcing our form of government onto others. If we want other countries to do as we do, then we probably ought to be doing as we want them to do. Bush said that "we expect them to be treated humanely, just like we’ll treat any prisoners of theirs that we capture humanely... If not, the people who mistreat the prisoners will be treated as war criminals."

I would gladly trade our current idiot in chief for Werner Klemperer's Colonel Klink. He was smarter, far more lucid and coherent, and, it seems, both more human and more humane.

[ Posted: 13:00 | comments: | print ]